Munich’s B&B: Beers & BMWs

Ah, what is there to talk about Munich – the land of BMW and Oktoberfest – other than their prized car and ‘liquid gold’, beer?

Text and Photos by Jennifer Ellson

Bavarian weissbier, or wheat beer

Bird's eye view of the BMW museumThe city of München, Munich’s native name, is known for two things: B&Bs, and not of the bed & breakfast variety. If you didn’t know that BMW stands for Bayerische Motoren Werke, or Bavarian Motor Works, well, now you do! Yes, my fast and furious friend, BMW is headquartered in Bavaria’s capital city. In fact, ‘Beemer’ even has an eye-popping museum with hundreds of sexy, sometimes topless cars (and in the summer, topless women as well at the park just across the building!) Enough ‘Bimmer’ motorcycles are also on display to make the Hells Angels say ‘hallelujah!’

Beemers on display at the museumBut this blogzine is not called ‘CarTrips’, or ‘BikeTrips’, is it? So let’s talk about the other thing Bavarians are just as serious about: their beer, of course!

The site of the OktoberfestIn particular, a Bavarian specialty beer, weissbier, in which malted barley is replaced with malted wheat. They are serious enough that there is a law saying weissbier brewed in Deutschland must be top-fermented – whatever that means. All I know (and care about, really) is that weissbier, literally ‘white beer’ in Deutsch, has this beautiful, sweet taste reminiscent of bananas.

As if that is not serious enough, there is also a certain way of serving weissbier, in a special slender glass nonetheless. Just remember this formula when pouring weissbier: a one-half liter of beer only needs half an inch of foam – one has to avoid producing too much head. When the bottle is near empty, swivel it so that it picks up the yeast at the bottom, as it completes the taste.

Now that you know how to serve it properly, you just have to know how to drink it right: drink lots of it! Yes, that’s all. Seriously, there’s no need to wear lederhosens to enjoy the brew.

There are several types of German white beers (as opposed to Belgian witbier), but if you stick to hefeweiss, literally ‘yeast white’, you will never go wrong. It is the unfiltered, cloudy type, which is probably the most popular amongst the Germans.

One last thing, you have to know how to pronounce it properly. Weissbier is pronounced as ‘vice-beer’.

Now you’re ready. So go ahead and give it a shot!

Prost! (Cheers!),

Jennifer on a BMW bike on display at the museum

Jennifer

(With additional photos by Amorvida Muyrong. All rights reserved.)

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  1. Sandra Meyers Reply

    I love beers but I’ve never tried this one yet. Will do now, thanks!

      • Sandra Meyers Reply

        i just had oettinger white beer! it is sweet and has a banana undertone, like you described! good work!

      • I like Oettinger too, and I drank a lot of that when I was in Germany/Austria! But since I live in BC now, and they have a lot of microbreweries here, I tend to opt for local brews, which are all good too!

  2. Jen Bailey Reply

    great piece! very informative!

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